Archives for July 2011

The Marketing Of Madness: Are We All Insane?

The Marketing of Madness is the definitive documentary on the psychiatric drugging industry. Here is the real story of the high income partnership between psychiatry and drug companies that has created an $80 billion psychotropic drug profit centre.

But appearances are deceiving. How valid are psychiatrists’ diagnoses – and how safe are their drugs? Digging deep beneath the corporate veneer, this three-part documentary exposes the truth behind the slick marketing schemes and scientific deceit that conceal dangerous and often deadly sales campaigns.

In this film you’ll discover that… Many of the drugs side effects may actually make your ‘mental illness’ worse. Psychiatric drugs can induce aggression or depression. Some psychotropic drugs prescribed to children are more addictive than cocaine. Psychiatric diagnoses appears to be based on dubious science. Of the 297 mental disorders contained with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, none can be objectively measured by pathological tests.

Mental illness symptoms within this manual are arbitrarily assigned by a subjective voting system in a psychiatric panel. It is estimated that 100 million people globally use psychotropic drugs.

The Marketing of Madness exposes the real insanity in our psychiatric ‘health care’ system: profit-driven drug marketing at the expense of human rights.

This film plunges into an industry corrupted by corporate greed and delivers a shocking warning from courageous experts who value public health over dollar.

 

 

Fructose Consumption Increases Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Study suggests U.S. Dietary Guideline for Upper Limit of Sugar Consumption is too High:

A recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) found that adults who consumed high fructose corn syrup for two weeks as 25 percent of their daily calorie requirement had increased blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which have been shown to be indicators of increased risk for heart disease.

The American Heart Association recommends that people consume only five percent of calories as added sugar. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 suggest an upper limit of 25 percent or less of daily calories consumed as added sugar. To address this discrepancy in recommended consumption levels, researchers examined what happened when young overweight and normal weight adults consumed fructose, high fructose corn syrup or glucose at the 25 percent upper limit.

“While there is evidence that people who consume sugar are more likely to have heart disease or diabetes, it is controversial as to whether high sugar diets may actually promote these diseases, and dietary guidelines are conflicting,” said the study’s senior author, Kimber Stanhope, PhD, of the University of California, Davis. “Our findings demonstrate that several factors associated with an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease were increased in individuals consuming 25 percent of their calories as fructose or high fructose corn syrup, but consumption of glucose did not have this effect.”

In this study, researchers examined 48 adults between the ages of 18 and 40 years and compared the effects of consuming 25 percent of one’s daily calorie requirement as glucose, fructose or high fructose corn syrup on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. They found that within two weeks, study participants consuming fructose or high fructose corn syrup, but not glucose, exhibited increased concentrations of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein-B (a protein which can lead to plaques that cause vascular disease).

“These results suggest that consumption of sugar may promote heart disease,” said Stanhope. “Additionally our findings provide evidence that the upper limit of 25 percent of daily calories consumed as added sugar as suggested by The Dietary Guidelines for American 2010 may need to be re-evaluated.”

Also working on the study were: Andrew Bremer, Guoxia Chen, Tak Hou Fong, Vivien Lee, Roseanne Menorca, Valentia Medici, Peter Havel and Nancy Keim of the University of California, Davis; Katsuyuki Nakajima and Takamitsu Nakano of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. in Tokyo, Japan; and Yasuki Ito of Denka Seiken Co. in Tokyo, Japan.

The article, “Consumption of fructose and high fructose corn syrup increase postprandial triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, and apolipoprotein-B in young men and women,” appears in the October 2011 issue of JCEM.

 

Antioxidants Of Growing Interest To Address Infertility, Erectile Dysfunction

A growing body of evidence suggests that antioxidants may have significant value in addressing infertility issues in both women and men, including erectile dysfunction, and researchers say that large, specific clinical studies are merited to determine how much they could help. The study this story is based on is available from ScholarsArchive@OSU: http://bit.ly/nNir7E

 

CORVALLIS, Ore. – A growing body of evidence suggests that antioxidants may have significant value in addressing infertility issues in both women and men, including erectile dysfunction, and researchers say that large, specific clinical studies are merited to determine how much they could help.

A new analysis, published online in the journal Pharmacological Research, noted that previous studies on the potential for antioxidants to help address this serious and growing problem have been inconclusive, but that other data indicates nutritional therapies may have significant potential.

The researchers also observed that infertility problems are often an early indicator of other degenerative disease issues such as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. The same approaches that may help treat infertility could also be of value to head off those problems, they said.

The findings were made by Tory Hagen, in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, and Francesco Visioli, lead author of the study at the Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Spain.

“If oxidative stress is an underlying factor causing infertility, which we think the evidence points to, we should be able to do something about it,” said Hagen, the Jamieson Chair of Healthspan Research in the Linus Pauling Institute. “This might help prevent other critical health problems as well, at an early stage when nutritional therapies often work best.”

The results from early research have been equivocal, Hagen said, but that may be because they were too small or did not focus on antioxidants. Laboratory and in-vitro studies have been very promising, especially with some newer antioxidants such as lipoic acid that have received much less attention.

“The jury is still out on this,” Hagen said. “But the problem is huge, and the data from laboratory studies is very robust, it all fits. There is evidence this might work, and the potential benefits could be enormous.”

The researchers from Oregon and Spain point, in particular, to inadequate production of nitric oxide, an agent that relaxes and dilates blood vessels. This is often caused, in turn, by free radicals that destroy nitric oxide and reduce its function. Antioxidants can help control free radicals. Some existing medical treatments for erectile dysfunction work, in part, by increasing production of nitric oxide.

Aging, which is often associated with erectile dysfunction problems, is also a time when nitric oxide synthesis begins to falter. And infertility problems in general are increasing, scientists say, as more people delay having children until older ages.

“Infertility is multifactorial and we still don’t know the precise nature of this phenomenon,” Visioli said.

If new approaches were developed successfully, the researchers said, they might help treat erectile dysfunction in men, egg implantation and endometriosis in women, and reduce the often serious and sometimes fatal condition of pre-eclampsia in pregnancy. The quality and health of semen and eggs might be improved.

As many as 50 percent of conceptions fail and about 20 percent of clinical pregnancies end in miscarriage, the researchers noted in their report. Both male and female reproductive dysfunction is believed to contribute to this high level of reproductive failure, they said, but few real causes have been identified.

“Some people and physicians are already using antioxidants to help with fertility problems, but we don’t have the real scientific evidence yet to prove its efficacy,” Hagen said. “It’s time to change that.”

Some commonly used antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E, could help, Hagen said. But others, such as lipoic acid, are a little more cutting-edge and set up a biological chain reaction that has a more sustained impact on vasomotor function and health.

Polyphenols, the phytochemicals that often give vegetables their intense color and are also found in chocolate and tea, are also of considerable interest. But many claims are being made and products marketed, the researchers said, before the appropriate science is completed – actions that have actually delayed doing the proper studies.

“There’s a large market of plant-based supplements that requires hard data,” Visioli said. “Most claims are not backed by scientific evidence and human trials. We still need to obtain proof of efficacy before people invest money and hope in preparations of doubtful efficacy.”

About the Linus Pauling Institute: The Linus Pauling Institute at OSU is a world leader in the study of micronutrients and their role in promoting optimum health or preventing and treating disease. Major areas of research include heart disease, cancer, aging and neurodegenerative disease.

 

Zinc Lozenges May Shorten the Duration of Colds

Zinc lozenges might be useful as a treatment option for the common cold, according to a meta-analysis published in The Open Respiratory Medicine Journal.  Studies have shown that taking a dose of more than 75 mg of zinc in the form of zinc lozenges per day cut the duration of the common cold by 20 to 42 percent.

 

 

Harri Hemilä
Zinc Lozenges May Shorten the Duration of Colds: A Systematic Review
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2011; 129 (1): 107-16.


ABSTRACT

Background:
A number of controlled trials have examined the effect of zinc lozenges on the common cold but the findings have diverged. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the total daily dose of zinc might explain part of the variation in the results.

Methods:
The Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials data bases were searched for placebocontrolled trials examining the effect of zinc lozenges on common cold duration. Two methods were used for analysis: the P-values of the trials were combined by using the Fisher method and the results of the trials were pooled by using the inverse-variance method. Both approaches were used for all the identified trials and separately for the low zinc dose and the high zinc dose trials.

Results:
Thirteen placebo-controlled comparisons have examined the therapeutic effect of zinc lozenges on common coldepisodes of natural origin. Five of the trials used a total daily zinc dose of less than 75 mg and uniformly found no effect. Three trials used zinc acetate in daily doses of over 75 mg, the pooled result indicating a 42% reduction in the duration of colds (95% CI: 35% to 48%). Five trials used zinc salts other than acetate in daily doses of over 75 mg, the pooled result indicating a 20% reduction in the duration of colds (95% CI: 12% to 28%).

Conclusions:
This study shows strong evidence that the zinc lozenge effect on common cold duration is heterogeneous so that benefit is observed with high doses of zinc but not with low doses. The effects of zinc lozenges should be further studied to determine the optimal lozenge compositions and treatment strategies.

 

Vitamin D Relieves Joint, Muscle Pain For Breast Cancer Patients

Assistant Professor Antonella Luisa Rastelli, M.D.

Washington University doctors have found that high-dose vitamin D helps relieve joint and muscle pain in breast cancer patients taking estrogen-lowering drugs. Known as aromatase inhibitors, the drugs are prescribed to treat breast tumors fueled by the hormone estrogen. They are less toxic than chemotherapy, but many patients experience severe musculoskeletal discomfort, including pain and stiffness in the hands, knees, hips, lower back, shoulders and feet.

 

 

Antonella L. Rastelli, Marie E. Taylor, Feng Ga, Roeina Armamento-Villareal, Shohreh Jamalabadi-Majidi, Nicola Napoli and Matthew J. Ellis
Vitamin D and aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS): a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2011; 129 (1): 107-16.

Abstract

A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized phase II trial was performed to determine whether High Dose Vitamin D2 supplementation (HDD) in women receiving adjuvant anastrozole improves aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletalsymptoms (AIMSS) and bone loss. Patients with early breast cancer and AIMSS were stratified according to their baseline 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) level. Stratum A (20-29 ng/ml) received either HDD 50,000 IU capsules weekly for 8 weeks then monthly for 4 months or placebo. Stratum B (10-19 ng/ml) received either HDD for 16 weeks and then monthly for 2 months, or placebo. AIMSS was assessed by the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was measured at baseline and at 6 months. The primary endpoint of the study was the change-from-baselinemusculoskeletal pain. The secondary endpoint was the percent change in BMD at 6 months. Sixty women were enrolled. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the groups. At 2 months, FIQ pain (P = 0.0045), BPI worst-pain (P = 0.04), BPI average-pain (P = 0.0067), BPI pain-severity (P = 0.04), and BPI interference (P = 0.034) scores were better in the HDD than placebo group. The positive effect of HDD on AIMSS was stronger across all time points in Stratum B than Stratum A (FIQ pain, P = 0.04; BPI average, P = 0.03; BPI severity, P = 0.03; BPI interference, P = 0.04). BMD at the femoral neck decreased in the placebo and did not change in the HDD group (P = 0.06). Weekly HDD improves AIMSS and may have a positive effect on bone health. Vitamin D supplementation strategies for breast cancer patients on AI should be further investigated.

 

Iron Rich Foods

Food Sources of Iron ranked by milligrams of iron per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All are  10% of RDA for teen and adult females, which is 18 mg/day.)

Food, Standard Amount

Iron (mg)

Calories

Clams, canned, drained, 3 oz

23.8

126

Fortified ready-to-eat cereals (various), ~ 1 oz

1.8 -21.1

  54-127

Oysters, eastern, wild, cooked, moist heat, 3 oz

10.2

116

Organ meats (liver, giblets), various, cooked, 3 oz a

5.2-9.9

134-235

Fortified instant cooked cereals (various), 1 packet

4.9-8.1

Varies

Soybeans, mature, cooked, ½ cup

4.4

149

Pumpkin and squash seed kernels, roasted, 1 oz

4.2

148

White beans, canned, ½ cup

3.9

153

Blackstrap molasses, 1 Tbsp

3.5

47

Lentils, cooked, ½ cup

3.3

115

Spinach, cooked from fresh, ½ cup

3.2

21

Beef, chuck, blade roast, lean, cooked, 3 oz

3.1

215

Beef, bottom round, lean, 0″ fat, all grades, cooked, 3 oz

2.8

182

Kidney beans, cooked, ½ cup

2.6

112

Sardines, canned in oil, drained, 3 oz

2.5

177

Beef, rib, lean, ¼” fat, all grades, 3 oz

2.4

195

Chickpeas, cooked, ½ cup

2.4

134

Duck, meat only, roasted, 3 oz

2.3

171

Lamb, shoulder, arm, lean, ¼ ” fat, choice, cooked, 3 oz

2.3

237

Prune juice, ¾ cup

2.3

136

Shrimp, canned, 3 oz

2.3

102

Cowpeas, cooked, ½ cup

2.2

100

Ground beef, 15% fat, cooked, 3 oz

2.2

212

Tomato puree, ½ cup

2.2

48

Lima beans, cooked, ½ cup

2.2

108

Soybeans, green, cooked, ½ cup

2.2

127

Navy beans, cooked, ½ cup

2.1

127

Refried beans, ½ cup

2.1

118

Beef, top sirloin, lean, 0″ fat, all grades, cooked, 3 oz

2.0

156

Tomato paste, ¼ cup

2.0

54

a High in cholesterol.

Source: Nutrient values from Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 17. Foods are from ARS single nutrient reports, sorted in descending order by nutrient content in terms of common household measures. Food items and weights in the single nutrient reports are adapted from those in 2002 revision of USDA Home and Garden Bulletin No. 72, Nutritive Value of Foods. Mixed dishes and multiple preparations of the same food item have been omitted from this table.

Vitamin A Rich Foods

Food Sources of Vitamin A ranked by micrograms Retinol Activity Equivalents (RAE) of vitamin A per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All are  20% of RDA for adult men, which is 900 mg/day RAE.)

Food, Standard Amount Vitamin A
(μg RAE)

Calories

Organ meats (liver, giblets), various, cooked, 3 oza

1490-9126

134-235

Carrot juice, ¾ cup

1692

  71

Sweetpotato with peel, baked, 1 medium

1096

103

Pumpkin, canned, ½ cup

953

42

Carrots, cooked from fresh, ½ cup

671

27

Spinach, cooked from frozen, ½ cup

573

30

Collards, cooked from frozen, ½ cup

489

31

Kale, cooked from frozen, ½ cup

478

20

Mixed vegetables, canned, ½ cup

474

  40

Turnip greens, cooked from frozen, ½ cup

441

24

Instant cooked cereals, fortified, prepared, 1 packet

285-376

75-97

Various ready-to-eat cereals, with added vit. A, ~1 oz

180-376

100-117

Carrot, raw, 1 small

301

20

Beet greens, cooked, ½ cup

276

19

Winter squash, cooked, ½ cup

268

38

Dandelion greens, cooked, ½ cup

260

18

Cantaloupe, raw, ¼ medium melon

233

46

Mustard greens, cooked, ½ cup

221

11

Pickled herring, 3 oz

219

222

Red sweet pepper, cooked, ½ cup

186

19

Chinese cabbage, cooked, ½ cup

180

10

a High in cholesterol.

Source: Nutrient values from Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 17. Foods are from ARS single nutrient reports, sorted in descending order by nutrient content in terms of common household measures. Food items and weights in the single nutrient reports are adapted from those in 2002 revision of USDA Home and Garden Bulletin No. 72, Nutritive Value of Foods. Mixed dishes and multiple preparations of the same food item have been omitted from this table.

 

Vitamin C Rich Foods

Food Sources of Vitamin C ranked by milligrams of vitamin C per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All provide  20% of RDA for adult men, which is 90 mg/day.)

Food, Standard Amount

Vitamin C (mg)

Calories

Guava, raw, ½ cup

188

56

Red sweet pepper, raw, ½cup

142

20

Red sweet pepper, cooked, ½ cup

  116

19

Kiwi fruit, 1 medium

70

46

Orange, raw, 1 medium

70

62

Orange juice, ¾ cup

61-93

79-84

Green pepper, sweet, raw, ½ cup

60

  15

Green pepper, sweet, cooked, ½ cup

51

  19

Grapefruit juice, ¾ cup

50-70

71-86

Vegetable juice cocktail, ¾ cup

50

34

Strawberries, raw, ½ cup

49

27

Brussels sprouts, cooked, ½ cup

48

28

Cantaloupe, ¼ medium

47

51

Papaya, raw, ¼ medium

47

30

Kohlrabi, cooked, ½ cup

45

24

Broccoli, raw, ½ cup

39

15

Edible pod peas, cooked, ½ cup

38

34

Broccoli, cooked, ½ cup

37

26

Sweetpotato, canned, ½ cup

34

  116

Tomato juice, ¾ cup

33

31

Cauliflower, cooked, ½ cup

28

17

Pineapple, raw, ½ cup

28

37

Kale, cooked, ½ cup

27

18

Mango, ½ cup

23

54

Source: Nutrient values from Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 17. Foods are from ARS single nutrient reports, sorted in descending order by nutrient content in terms of common household measures. Food items and weights in the single nutrient reports are adapted from those in 2002 revision of USDA Home and Garden Bulletin No. 72, Nutritive Value of Foods. Mixed dishes and multiple preparations of the same food item have been omitted from this table.

Magnesium Rich Foods

Food Sources of Magnesium ranked by milligrams of magnesium per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All are  10% of RDA for adult men, which is 420 mg/day.)

Food, Standard Amount

Magnesium (mg)

Calories

Pumpkin and squash seed kernels, roasted, 1 oz

151

148

Brazil nuts, 1 oz

107

186

Bran ready-to-eat cereal (100%), ~1 oz

103

74

Halibut, cooked, 3 oz

91

  119

Quinoa, dry, ¼ cup

89

159

Spinach, canned, ½ cup

81

25

Almonds, 1 oz

78

164

Spinach, cooked from fresh, ½ cup

78

  20

Buckwheat flour, ¼ cup

75

101

Cashews, dry roasted, 1 oz

74

163

Soybeans, mature, cooked, ½ cup

74

  149

Pine nuts, dried, 1 oz

71

191

Mixed nuts, oil roasted, with peanuts, 1 oz

67

175

White beans, canned, ½ cup

67

154

Pollock, walleye, cooked, 3 oz

62

96

Black beans, cooked, ½ cup

60

  114

Bulgur, dry, ¼ cup

57

120

Oat bran, raw, ¼ cup

55

58

Soybeans, green, cooked, ½ cup

54

  127

Tuna, yellowfin, cooked, 3 oz

54

  118

Artichokes (hearts), cooked, ½ cup

50

  42

Peanuts, dry roasted, 1 oz

50

166

Lima beans, baby, cooked from frozen, ½ cup

50

  95

Beet greens, cooked, ½ cup

49

19

Navy beans, cooked, ½ cup

48

127

Tofu, firm, prepared with nigaria , ½ cup

47

  88

Okra, cooked from frozen, ½ cup

47

  26

Soy beverage, 1 cup

47

127

Cowpeas, cooked, ½ cup

46

100

Hazelnuts, 1 oz

46

178

Oat bran muffin, 1 oz

45

77

Great northern beans, cooked, ½ cup

44

104

Oat bran, cooked, ½ cup

44

44

Buckwheat groats, roasted, cooked, ½ cup

43

78

Brown rice, cooked, ½ cup

42

108

Haddock, cooked, 3 oz

42

95

a Calcium sulfate and magnesium chloride.

Source: Nutrient values from Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 17. Foods are from ARS single nutrient reports, sorted in descending order by nutrient content in terms of common household measures. Food items and weights in the single nutrient reports are adapted from those in 2002 revision of USDA Home and Garden Bulletin No. 72, Nutritive Value of Foods. Mixed dishes and multiple preparations of the same food item have been omitted from this table.

Vitamin E Rich Foods

Food Sources of Vitamin E ranked by milligrams of vitamin E per standard amount; also calories in the standard amount. (All provide  10% of RDA for vitamin E for adults, which is 15 mg a-tocopherol [AT]/day.)

Food, Standard Amount

AT (mg)

Calories

Fortified ready-to-eat cereals, ~1 oz

1.6-12.8

90-107

Sunflower seeds, dry roasted, 1 oz

7.4

165

Almonds, 1 oz

7.3

164

Sunflower oil, high linoleic, 1 Tbsp

5.6

120

Cottonseed oil, 1 Tbsp

4.8

120

Safflower oil, high oleic, 1 Tbsp

4.6

120

Hazelnuts (filberts), 1 oz

4.3

178

Mixed nuts, dry roasted, 1 oz

3.1

168

Turnip greens, frozen, cooked, ½ cup

2.9

24

Tomato paste, ¼ cup

2.8

54

Pine nuts, 1 oz

2.6

191

Peanut butter, 2 Tbsp

2.5

192

Tomato puree, ½ cup

2.5

48

Tomato sauce, ½ cup

2.5

39

Canola oil, 1 Tbsp

2.4

124

Wheat germ, toasted, plain, 2 Tbsp

2.3

54

Peanuts, 1 oz

2.2

166

Avocado, raw, ½ avocado

2.1

161

Carrot juice, canned, ¾ cup

2.1

71

Peanut oil, 1 Tbsp

2.1

119

Corn oil, 1 Tbsp

1.9

120

Olive oil, 1 Tbsp

1.9

119

Spinach, cooked, ½ cup

1.9

21

Dandelion greens, cooked, ½ cup

1.8

18

Sardine, Atlantic, in oil, drained, 3 oz

1.7

177

Blue crab, cooked/canned, 3 oz

1.6

84

Brazil nuts, 1 oz

1.6

186

Herring, Atlantic, pickled, 3 oz

1.5

222

Source: Nutrient values from Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 17. Foods are from ARS single nutrient reports, sorted in descending order by nutrient content in terms of common household measures. Food items and weights in the single nutrient reports are adapted from those in 2002 revision of USDA Home and Garden Bulletin No. 72, Nutritive Value of Foods. Mixed dishes and multiple preparations of the same food item have been omitted from this table.