Why all migraine patients should be treated with magnesium

Magnesium, the second most abundant intracellular cation, is essential in many intracellular processes and appears to play an important role in migraine pathogenesis. Routine blood tests do not reflect true body magnesium stores since <2 % is in the measurable, extracellular space, 67 % is in the bone and 31 % is located intracellularly. Lack of magnesium may promote cortical spreading depression, hyperaggregation of platelets, affect serotonin receptor function, and influence synthesis and release of a variety of neurotransmitters. Migraine sufferers may develop magnesium deficiency due to genetic inability to absorb magnesium, inherited renal magnesium wasting, excretion of excessive amounts of magnesium due to stress, low nutritional intake, and several other reasons. There is strong evidence that magnesium deficiency is much more prevalent in migraine sufferers than in healthy controls. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have produced mixed results, most likely because both magnesium deficient and non-deficient patients were included in these trials. This is akin to giving cyanocobalamine in a blinded fashion to a group of people with peripheral neuropathy without regard to their cyanocobalamine levels. Both oral and intravenous magnesium are widely available, extremely safe, very inexpensive and for patients who are magnesium deficient can be highly effective. Considering these features of magnesium, the fact that magnesium deficiency may be present in up to half of migraine patients, and that routine blood tests are not indicative of magnesium status, empiric treatment with at least oral magnesium is warranted in all migraine sufferers.

Journal of Neural Transmission, Online First™ – SpringerLinkMagnesium, the second most abundant intracellular cation, is essential in many intracellular processes and appears to play an important role in migraine pathogenesis. Routine blood tests do not reflect true body magnesium stores since <2 % is in the measurable, extracellular space, 67 % is in the bone and 31 % is located intracellularly.

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Reference

Mauskop A, Varughese J. Why all migraine patients should be treated with magnesium. J Neural Transm. 2012 Mar 18. [Epub ahead of print]

 

What is Magnesium?

Learn about Magnesium, benefits and what can happen to the body with lack of magnesium.

What is Magnesium? Videogram. Colorado Springs, CO: Mineralife LLC, 2011.

Miraculous Magnesium

Lyle Hurd, of Total Health magazine, explains the many health benefits maganesium supplements provide the body (2007).

Magnesium

Pharmacist Max Motyka shares in this video (2008) the importance of magnesium. It plays a role in more than 400 enzyme reactions in our bodies, so we need to make sure we’re getting enough.

 

Nutraceuticals and Headache: The Biological Basis

Headaches are a common and debilitating ailment from which most people suffer at one time or another. Common types of headaches include tension headaches, migraines, cluster headaches and sinus headaches. Headaches can have many causes, but serious causes of headaches are rare. 

This review discusses the biological basis for non-conventional or non-mainstream approaches to the treatment of migraine. Dr. Frederick Taylor discuss in this context magnesium, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, petasites, feverfew, marijuana/cannabis, and oxygen/ hyperbaric oxygen.  

 

Frederick R. Taylor

Nutraceuticals and Headache: The Biological Basis

Headache 2011; 51 (3): 484-501

 

ABSTRACT

Nutrition must affect the structure and functioning of the brain. Since the brain has very high metabolic activity, what we consume throughout the day is likely to dramatically influence both its structure and moment to moment function. It follows that nutritional approaches to all neurological disorders are being researched and entering medical practice, while nutraceutical use is a mainstay of public habits. This review discusses the biological basis for non-conventional or non-mainstream approaches to the treatment of migraine. This requires at least limited discussion of current migraine pathophysiologic theory. How nutrients and other chemicals and approaches are mechanistically involved within migraine pathways is the focus of this article. The nutraceuticals reviewed in detail are: magnesium, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, petasites, and feverfew with additional comments on marijuana and oxygen/hyperbaric oxygen. This article reviews the science when known related to the potential genetic susceptibility and sensitivity to these treatments. As we know, the basic science in this field is very preliminary, so whether to combine approaches and presumably mechanisms or use them alone or with or without conventional therapies is far from clear. Nonetheless, as more patients and providers participate in patient-centered approaches to care, knowledge of the science underpinning nutritional, nutraceutical, and complementary approaches to treatment for migraine will certainly benefit this interaction.