Heavy Metals & Infertility

Professor Ingrid Gerhard, M.D.

Professor Ingrid Gerhard, M.D. and her colleagues have been seriously investigating the effect of heavy metals as well as pesticides on fertility. Associated with the University of Heidelberg Gynecological Clinic, Professor Gerhard’s group has examined more than 1,000 patients for mercury, fertility problems and symptoms. Patients were also examined for pesticide contamination. Urine mercury levels were measured after administering an oral chelating agent (Dimaval), and blood was examined for various polychlorinated compounds. The high mercury group had more hormonal disturbances, immune disturbances, recurring fungal infections, alopecia and allergies. A number of different hormonal disturbances were found, sex hormones among them. These differences were all statistically significant and some were very marked. Allergies and hair loss were 2-3 times more common in the high-mercury group. The doctors at the clinic have successfully treated fertility problems with a combination of vitamins/minerals and amalgam removal. [Excerpted from an article by Sam Ziff]

 

Ingrid Gerhard, Bondo Monga, Andreas Waldbrenner and Benno Runnebaum

Heavy metals and fertility

J Toxicol Environ Health A 1998; 54 (8): 593-611 


ABSTRACT

Heavy metals have been identified as factors affecting human fertility. This study was designed to investigate whether the urinary heavy metal excretion is associated with different factors of infertility. The urinary heavy metal excretion was determined in 501 infertile women after oral administration of the chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (DMPS). Furthermore, the influence of trace element and vitamin administration on metal excretion was investigated. Significant correlations were found between different heavy metals and clinical parameters (age, body mass index, nationality) as well as gynecological conditions (uterine fibroids, miscarriages, hormonal disorders). Diagnosis and reduction of an increased heavy metal body load improved the spontaneous conception chances of infertile women. The DMPS test was a useful and complementary diagnostic method. Adequate treatment provides successful alternatives to conventional hormonal therapy.

 

Related Video

David Kennedy, DDS discusses the study by professor Ingrid Gerhard and co-workers.

 

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